How to make a beaded bangle bracelet – a beading tutorial | Projects | Beads Direct
0

How to make a beaded bangle bracelet – a beading tutorial

Information about this project

Designed by: Paula Ziemska

Difficulty: Intermediate

Rating:

Hi everyone,

I present you my newest tutorial. I don’t know about you, but I really like bracelets, especially the bangle ones. You don’t need to struggle with clasps, lobsters, you don’t need to think if the clasps are strong enough, they have that WOW effect. Today, we will make a beaded bangle bracelet.

Supplies used in this project:

  • 4mm Fire Polish beads – 3 packets (FP4) or 4mm Faceted CrystaLove or 4mm Faceted Semi-Precious rounds
  • crystals – 3 mm bicone (you may use 3 mm Fire Polish as well) (BC)
  • jewellery needle 
  • scissors
  • 8/0 and 11/0 TOHO beads
  • Jewellery thread – at least 0.15 mm* monofilament or a jewellery wire

*I used Beadsmith thread in the tutorial to let you see everything clearly, but a bangle bracelet should be made using a jewellery wire.

Remember, our tutorials are mainly for learning the technique and inspiration for creating your own beading projects. Below the tutorial you may find several versions of this bracelet – it’s worth using various colours and play with the pattern.

Take out your beads and let’s start!

Step 1

Prepare a long piece of a thread – about 2 m long with some margin. I know that stitching with such a long thread might be difficult, but a bracelet looks better when it’s made of one piece of a thread. String 4 FP4 beads.

Step 1

Step 2

Pass the needle through all the beads strung once again to close them in  a square.

Step 1

Step 3

Tie a knot with both endings.

Step 1

Step 4

Pass the needle through a FP4 bead.

Step 1

Step 5

String 3 FP4 beads and pass the needle through the bead you exited. There are two squares now.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 6

Pass the needle through the top FP4 and add 3 beads. Continue adding the beads the same way until you have reached the desirable length of you bracelet.

For a 15 cm wrist and a thin palm – 93 beads is enough (91 beads in the rows + 2 links)

For a 16 cm wrist – 96 beads (94 beads in the rows + 2 links)

For a 17 cm wrist – 99 beads (97 beads in the rows + 2 links)

Step 1

Step 7

As you have stitched the desirable amount of rows, it’s time to connect your bracelet. String 1 FP4 and pass the needle to stitch the beginning of your bracelet to its end. Make sure your bracelet doesn’t twist.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 8

String 1 FP4 and make the 2nd side of the last square.

Step 1

Step 9

Pass the needle through a bead that lies horizontally.

Step 1

Step 10

String 1 TH8/0 and pass the needle through the nearest FP4.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 11

Add the beads the same way around the whole bracelet.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 12

All the beads added, now you can move on the other side of the bracelet. Pass the needle so that the thread comes out of a bead that lies horizontally at the other side of the bracelet, string 1 TH8/0 and pass the needle through the nearest FP4 bead. Continue until you have completed the whole row.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 13

At this stage, the bracelet may appear too wide and too loose, but the more you add at the finish stage, the tighten the bracelet gets. To brace it, pass the needle through all the beads (both FP4 and TH8/0) with the thread only (both top and bottom sides).

Step 1

Step 14

It’s a bit more stiff now. Now for some decorative elements. Everything depends on the number of squares in your bracelets – whether it’s even or odd.

For the even ones you may stitch the patterns alternately – as it’s shown in the tutorial. But, if there are, e.g. 31 squares it’s good to make a plain decoration (at the end of the tutorial you may find some examples and comparisons of bracelets). My bracelet has an even number of squares so I will show you both methods.

First of all, pass the needle so that the thread comes out of a FP4 beads that lies vertically. String 5 TH11/0 and pass diagonally through the nearest vertical FP4.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 15

String BC – TH11/0 – BC and pass diagonally through the nearest FP 4.

Step 1

Step 16

Continue adding the beads the same way until you have completed the whole circle.

Step 1

Step 17

As you have completed the whole circle, turn back. The needle should come out of a vertical FP4 bead in the sequence with BC. String 1 BC and pass the needle through the central TH11/0. The TH11/0’s hole should be placed horizontally.

Step 1

Step 18

String 1 BC and pass the needle through the nearest FP 4.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 19

Form the next square by adding (in total) 4 TH11/0 beads. String 2 beads, pass through the central TH11/0 again and string 2 beads. You should have an X. Continue until you have completed the whole circle. Have you noticed that with every added bead your bracelet gets tighter and round?

Step 1

Step 20

As you have added all of the beads, pass with the needle through both sides of the bracelets (as it was done after adding TH8/0).

If you used bicone beads, pass through the decorative elements too – bicone beads have sharp edges and 1 strand of a fishing wire may simply break after some time. With FP3 beads the risk is minimal. After that, hide and secure the thread and trim – your bracelet is finished.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 21

Here you can see my little collection of bracelets.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 22

The pattern from the tutorial – an even number of beads and the decorative elements stitched alternately.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 23

Here you may see 3 kinds of decorative elements.

Step 1

Step 24

And here – 1 kind.

Step 1

Step 25

I hope you like the tutorial and I would love to see your beaded bangles. Show the effects of your work on our Facebook Group. Good luck!

Step 1