How to cover a Nunn channel bangle bracelet with beads – a DIY turotial | Projects | Beads Direct
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How to cover a Nunn channel bangle bracelet with beads – a DIY turotial

Information about this project

Designed by: Marta Draganek

Difficulty: Intermediate

Rating:

Marta Draganek has prepared a tutorial especially for you in which she shows you how to make a peyote bracelet. You will learn how to use TOHO beads, peyote stitch and a Nunn base in a creative way. And all of this in one bracelet! Difficult? Not with us! There’s nothing like handmade presents and such an effective bracelet makes a perfect gift.

I present you another effective, beading project made of tiny TOHO beads! I’m going to show you how to cover a metal base with a multicolour ethnic peyote stitch pattern. So take out your needles and let’s do this!

Supplies used in this project:

  • bracelet base – NUNN – stainless steel, 65mm of inner dimension, 12mm wide. The base is channeled around. You can fill the channel with TOHO beads working with peyote or square stitch or with a bead loom.
  • 15/0 TOHO Round beads – I’ve designed a geometric pattern in white, black, green and silver. I used: Opaque White, Opaque Jet, Opaque Sour Apple and Permanent Finish Galvanized Aluminum.
  • jewellery thread – TOHO One-G – black, wax coated thread. You may also use a monofilament thread.
  • beading needle – Size 12. The needle must pass through 15/0 beads several times with ease.

Step 1

Filling the base is not as difficult as it may seem., but it requires some patience. Planning and stitching the beading pattern took me about 8 hours.

The inner dimension of my base is 65mm. The outside circumference equals 21cm. I counted that I needed 130 rows of 15/0 TOHO beads stitched with peyote to fill the channel. So I designed a pattern that is repeated every 13 rows. The width of the pattern equals 9 TOHO beads so we’re going to work with odd count peyote stitch.

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Step 2

Those of you who have already worked with the peyote stitch will do well with the pattern above. I prepared pictures which will help the beginners to learn the technique.

Rows 1-2

Prepare a comfortable piece of thread (you may attach a new thread any time if you need). I usually work with 1.2 – 1.5m long threads. String the beads from the 1-2 rows of the pattern starting form the top left corner, that is: 1x Opaque Jet, 2x Aluminum, 2x Opaque White, 2x Aluminum, 2x Opaque Jet.

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Row 3

Wrap a 10-12cm tail thread around your index finger (this will prevent the beads from sliding down and will help to keep them at their place). Now, we need to add the beads of the 3rd row between the beads of the 1-2 rows to create a brick wall. According to the pattern, stitch 1 Sour Apple bead (marked with a black dot) and pass the needle through the second to last black bead of the previous row.

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Step 4

Then, according to the pattern, add 1 bead each time between each two beads (1x Opaque Jet, 1x Aluminum, 1x Opaque White, 1x Aluminum).

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Step 5

Since this is the odd count peyote stitch, we need to turn back in every odd row to step up to the even row.

Pass the needle down through the black and silver beads of the 2nd row.

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Step 6

Pass the needle through the silver bead below.

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Step 7

Pass up through the nearest bead of the 3rd row.

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Step 8

Pass the needle up across through the beads of the 1-2 rows.

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Step 9

Pass the needle down through the 1st bead of the 3rd row. Now we can start adding the beads of the 4th row.

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Step 10

Row 4

Add a bead between each two beads of the 2nd row according to the pattern, that is (1x Opaque White, 1x Aluminum, 1x Opaque Jet, 1x Sour Apple).

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Step 11

The 4th row is even so after adding all of the beads we can step up to the 5th row at once.

Row 5 (1x Opaque Jet, 1x Sour Apple, 1x Opaque Jet, 1x Aluminum, 1x Opaque White).

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Step 12

After completing the 5th row, we need to turn back again.

Pass the needle down through the nearest bead and through the bead placed below diagonally.

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Step 13

Pass the needle up through the nearest bead…

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Step 14

… and through the bead placed diagonally.

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Step 15

Pass the needle down through the 1st bead of the 5th row.

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Step 16

We can step up to the next even row, that is the 6th one.

Row 6.

Add the beads according to the pattern (1x Aluminum, 1x Opaque Jet, 1x Sour Apple, 1x Opaque Jet).

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Step 17

Continue adding the even and odd rows according to the pattern. As you have finished the 13th row, repeat the pattern from its beginning until you have reached the desirable length. For a 21cm circumference base you need to repeat the sequence 10 times.

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Step 18

As you have completed your peyote weave, wrap it around the metal base. The beginning and the end should mesh with each other like a zipper

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Step 19

Stitch the beginning and the end to each other pulling the thread tightly, so that the linking threads won’t show.

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Step 20

Hide the threads inside the beads – simply, pass the threads through the beads around and trim.

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Step 21

Below you can see how a finished bracelet looks!

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Step 22

Knowing the exact number of rows to fill the channel and the number of beads in a row, you can create your very own, unique bracelet pattern. On the Internet, you can find programmes which you can design your beading patterns with, e.g. BeadTool (download the English version here http://www.beadtool.net/download.html). Unfortunately, the free trial version doesn’t allow to save the results of your work and edit them later, but it helps to visualise your initial bracelet project.

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