Frost Bangle - Jewellery Making Tutorial | beadsdirect.co.uk
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Frost Bangle - Jewellery Making Tutorial

Information about project:

Frost Bangle - Jewellery Making Tutorial

Designed by: Julie Dudley

Difficulty: Beginner

Rating:

Julie shows us how easy it can be to mix wire work with stitched bead work to stunning effect. The lovely textures of the gorgeous bangle give a whole new meaning to mixing mediums. Are you ready to give it a go? Let's get Creative! 

You can add all the items you need to your basket by clicking the box in the 'Products used' section above, or you can let your imagination run wild and choose your own materials from the links below. Please note that the colours for the products illustrated in the image above may not match the 'Products List'.

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We believe that jewellery should be as individual as you are and so our tutorials are for inspiration and learning purposes. They include links to the relevant categories for you to choose your own colour combinations and we positively encourage you to experiment with different shapes, sizes, finishes, composition and texture. Why not choose your own colours to achieve something in your own style? Let your creative imagination run wild and make your dream piece of jewellery.

Designed by Julie Dudley - October 2021

Step 1

Thread your needle with 1.4 metres of crystal fireline, or thread of your choice.

(I'm using black fireline purely for demo purposes)

Add a stop bead approximately 15 cm from the end of your thread. (A stop bead is a bead of a different colour to your work, which you thread on, and then take your needle back through to secure it. This stops your work coming off the thread)

For anyone who knows peyote Stitch, we are going to make a 24 bead 10 row flat even count peyote.

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Add 24 of the hex cut beads to your thread (try to pick beads of a similar size to keep your work even)

We are then going to change direction.

Add a bead to your thread, miss the first bead and sew through the second. Give the thread a bit of a wiggle to make sure that there are two beads sitting on top of each other at the end.

You will then miss the next bead in the row, add another bead to your thread and sew through the next bead.

I find the start of peyote easier if I hold the length of beads that were threaded at the beginning, in my none dominant hand (left) and drop a bead down the thread slightly and sew a bead through the next. Making sure that I keep the tension and beads sitting nicely.

Carry on missing a bead and adding a bead through the next until you get to the end.

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This will be row three: turn your work to change direction. I always work right to left.

As you look at your work, you will see beads alternately sticking up. We are going to add a bead to each gap..

So add a bead to your thread as the very first gap is at the start, and sew through the next bead.

Pick up another bead and sew through the next bead which is sticking up.

Keep adding beads into each gap, until you get to the end.

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Turn your work again, and Follow step Three until you have finished ten rows of peyote Stitch.

Please note... If you are new to peyote, you will find that ten rows doesn't mean that you will have ten beads high of beading.

It is far easier when you are starting out with peyote to keep track of how many times you turn your work, for another row.

This is because to count rows of peyote, you do so in a zig zag pattern, which can be confusing to begin with.

In this instance, ten rows means that you will have six beads high of work on the end!

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You now have your ten rows of flat even count peyote, but we are now going to turn it into a tube....

Gently roll your beading together, and you will notice beads sticking up again on either side. We are going to sew this together in a zig zag.

Firstly take your needle through the bead above on the opposite edge to pull your work together. Then through the bead sticking up just diagonally below on the opposite side.

Next go back to the other side and sew through the bead sticking up diagonally down the line.

Then back to the bottom edge and sew through the bead sticking up diagonally below the last.

Keep sewing back and forth through the beads sticking up, until you reach the end of your work and exit the last bead.

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You are now exiting an end bead next to a bead with your other thread end. Tie these together in a double knot before we continue.

Sew through your beadwork randomly making sure that the thread is hidden inside each bead and not showing on the outside anywhere.

Knot in a few places by passing your needle between a gap where two beads meet, just under the threads below (you should be able to feel if you have gone under the thread with your needle).  Pull your thread slowly until a loop forms, then pass your needle through that loop and pull gently until the knot forms.

Carry on sewing through your work, then trim that thread.

Thread your needle onto the other thread end, and sew through your work in the same way.

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You now have your tube and need to create the wire bracelet.

Measure the length of your peyote tube.... mine is around 6.5cm, and yours should be similar.

Warm part of the hematite wire on the reel, by rubbing between your thumb and forefinger.

You need to cut a piece of wire at least 1.5cm longer on each end than the length of your tube, so you can create your loops. So I need at least 9.5cm, but I have have rounded up to 10cm.

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Put your beading onto your length of wire, and gently bend using your thumbs and forefingers. You want a slight arch, don't bend too far because of your beading.

Make sure that the beading is central on the wire, and the arch facing upwards.

Take your flat nose pliers and create a sharp bend upwards in the wire right next to the beadwork.

Repeat at the other end.

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Take your round nose pliers and hold the very tip of one end of the wire flush with nothing sticking out. This helps to create the perfect loop, rather than a P-shape.

Roll the wire with your pliers re adjusting your hand when necessary. You don't want to be gripping so very tight, that you dent the wire. It's more of a gentle coaxing until you get the right pressure.

Make sure that the loop end meets nicely, if not adjust until you have the perfect loop.

Repeat with the other end.


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With the wire kept on the reel, begin to warm slightly as before, between your thumb and forefinger. This makes the wire more supple.

Coax it around into a half circle shape still leaving it on the reel.

Unless you know the exact size you will need two good ways to measure for the wire section, is to lay the beaded section on top of your wrist and either use a tape measure from one side to the other adding 1.5 cm to each end of the measurement. But don't pull the tape measure exceptionally tight or you will have a tight bracelet.

Or as I have, bring the wire that is on your reel underneath your wrist so that it overlaps the loops on the beaded section by approximately 1.5cm on one side and on the other side cut the wire approximately 1.5cm after it meets the loop on the beading.

You can always try it against your wrist again and adjust if it is slightly too long.

My wrist is around 18cm and I needed 12cm plus the 1.5cm for each loop, so 15cm of wire in total.

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Measure 1.5cm from the end of the wire and make a sharp bend upright in line with your wire using your flat nose pliers.

Repeat on the other end.

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As before, place the end of your wire between your round nose pliers and create a loop by rotating your hand and the wire.

Repeat with the other end.

You now have a horseshoe shape with two loops. If it isn't very perfectly rounded, either use a large mandrel, or something like a tin of beans to adjust, and check it next to your wrist.

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Hold the horseshoe section with the open ends of the wire facing up and take one of the loops and cut approximately 0.2-0.3 mm of the end of the wire off (this is to work as the clasp on the bracelet).

Try one of the loops on the beaded section over the hook. It needs to fit over it and the gap not be too large, but be easy to take on and off. If it fits snug the bracelet will be more secure. If the gap is too large or too small adjust with your round nose pliers.

Take a needle file or nail file and carefully file any sharp edges from the end of the cut loop, being careful not to touch or damage other parts of the wire.

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Open the next loop on the wire section, by opening away from you like a gate with your flat nose pliers. Attached the loop on the beaded section, and close the loop.

You now have your finished bracelet and can add charms or whatever you like to the loop on the closed end of your beadwork.

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